Full speed ahead

Professor Catherine Holloway explains how UCL’s Global Disability Innovation Hub is accelerating plans for a fairer world

A man running up hill with a prosthetic leg

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

Global Disability Innovation (GDI) Hub wants to change the way the world thinks about disability. This is not a public-relations exercise, but a dynamic and multi-faceted centre of experts and thinkers from across UCL and beyond. Led by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences, it is engaged with both academic research and inclusive innovation design.

However, GDI Hub also leads on advocacy and the bigger picture of making life more accessible for all. “GDI Hub’s successes range from small nudges of policy and helping to point people in the right direction, to major global partnerships addressing problems such as the lack of assistive technology for people around the world,” explains its Academic Director, Professor Catherine Holloway.

More on that later, but first it’s important to understand how it all began.

On your marks

When UCL was planning the design of UCL East as part of the 2012 Paralympic legacy, the then-Dean of Engineering Sciences, Professor Anthony Finkelstein CBE, put out a call for staff to suggest ideas.

Professor Holloway pitched “a modest idea” to improve access to existing technologies and also create a space at UCL for co-design. She was introduced to Victoria Austin and Ian McKinnon, who were key members of the 2020 Paralympic Legacy delivery team. The pair had led programmes for 250,000 disabled people to take part in sports, created Mandeville Place (the Olympic Park orchard dedicated to the Paralympic legacy) and made the entire Olympic Park accessible.

Following a chat about policy and practice around disability inclusion, and with additional expertise from Associate Professor Maria Kett, the team collaborated on a successful bid for a £10,000 grant from UCL’s Grand Challenges 2030 (matched by London Legacy Development Corporation). With that money, they hosted a week of events with various partners on everything from design mobility solutions to plastic surgery and dynamic sport prosthetics.

“Everyone was invited to participate,” says Professor Holloway, “and at the end, we held a conversation that enabled us to work out what we wanted to achieve. That’s how we came up with GDI Hub and defined our mission: to accelerate disability innovation for a fairer world.”

Their goal at the time was to extend the Paralympic legacy so that they could continue to do research and teaching, but also advocacy. “We went from a humble idea to somehow having a research portfolio of £26 million. It’s been a team effort,” says Professor Holloway.

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

Global Disability Innovation (GDI) Hub wants to change the way the world thinks about disability. This is not a public-relations exercise, but a dynamic and multi-faceted centre of experts and thinkers from across UCL and beyond. Led by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences, it is engaged with both academic research and inclusive innovation design.

However, GDI Hub also leads on advocacy and the bigger picture of making life more accessible for all. “GDI Hub’s successes range from small nudges of policy and helping to point people in the right direction, to major global partnerships addressing problems such as the lack of assistive technology for people around the world,” explains its Academic Director, Professor Catherine Holloway.

More on that later, but first it’s important to understand how it all began.

On your marks

When UCL was planning the design of UCL East as part of the 2012 Paralympic legacy, the then-Dean of Engineering Sciences, Professor Anthony Finkelstein CBE, put out a call for staff to suggest ideas.

Professor Holloway pitched “a modest idea” to improve access to existing technologies and also create a space at UCL for co-design. She was introduced to Victoria Austin and Ian McKinnon, who were key members of the 2020 Paralympic Legacy delivery team. The pair had led programmes for 250,000 disabled people to take part in sports, created Mandeville Place (the Olympic Park orchard dedicated to the Paralympic legacy) and made the entire Olympic Park accessible.

Following a chat about policy and practice around disability inclusion, and with additional expertise from Associate Professor Maria Kett, the team collaborated on a successful bid for a £10,000 grant from UCL’s Grand Challenges 2030 (matched by London Legacy Development Corporation). With that money, they hosted a week of events with various partners on everything from design mobility solutions to plastic surgery and dynamic sport prosthetics.

“Everyone was invited to participate,” says Professor Holloway, “and at the end, we held a conversation that enabled us to work out what we wanted to achieve. That’s how we came up with GDI Hub and defined our mission: to accelerate disability innovation for a fairer world.”

Their goal at the time was to extend the Paralympic legacy so that they could continue to do research and teaching, but also advocacy. “We went from a humble idea to somehow having a research portfolio of £26 million. It’s been a team effort,” says Professor Holloway.

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

Global Disability Innovation (GDI) Hub wants to change the way the world thinks about disability. This is not a public-relations exercise, but a dynamic and multi-faceted centre of experts and thinkers from across UCL and beyond. Led by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences, it is engaged with both academic research and inclusive innovation design.

However, GDI Hub also leads on advocacy and the bigger picture of making life more accessible for all. “GDI Hub’s successes range from small nudges of policy and helping to point people in the right direction, to major global partnerships addressing problems such as the lack of assistive technology for people around the world,” explains its Academic Director, Professor Catherine Holloway.

More on that later, but first it’s important to understand how it all began.

On your marks

When UCL was planning the design of UCL East as part of the 2012 Paralympic legacy, the then-Dean of Engineering Sciences, Professor Anthony Finkelstein CBE, put out a call for staff to suggest ideas.

Professor Holloway pitched “a modest idea” to improve access to existing technologies and also create a space at UCL for co-design. She was introduced to Victoria Austin and Ian McKinnon, who were key members of the 2020 Paralympic Legacy delivery team. The pair had led programmes for 250,000 disabled people to take part in sports, created Mandeville Place (the Olympic Park orchard dedicated to the Paralympic legacy) and made the entire Olympic Park accessible.

Following a chat about policy and practice around disability inclusion, and with additional expertise from Associate Professor Maria Kett, the team collaborated on a successful bid for a £10,000 grant from UCL’s Grand Challenges 2030 (matched by London Legacy Development Corporation). With that money, they hosted a week of events with various partners on everything from design mobility solutions to plastic surgery and dynamic sport prosthetics.

“Everyone was invited to participate,” says Professor Holloway, “and at the end, we held a conversation that enabled us to work out what we wanted to achieve. That’s how we came up with GDI Hub and defined our mission: to accelerate disability innovation for a fairer world.”

Their goal at the time was to extend the Paralympic legacy so that they could continue to do research and teaching, but also advocacy. “We went from a humble idea to somehow having a research portfolio of £26 million. It’s been a team effort,” says Professor Holloway.

A pair of specialist glasses being made

Thought process

GDI Hub’s latest launch is a £4 million Assistive Technologies Impact Fund (via a research grant from the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO)) that will look at how to grow assistive technologies globally, specifically in low- and middle-income countries, with a focus on Africa.

“The really interesting bit for UCL is thinking about how we feed research expertise into something like that and how we can make the process of innovation better,” says Professor Holloway. “A lot of innovation process tends to stay within a fund and is not disseminated, but something like assistive technology is never going to be a quick-win fund. This does not mean it can’t be high growth.

The trick will be in the match between business model and technological advance. We need people who are investing mainly for the social good for now and are happy to shoulder risk as we make this sector work. And we want that social-good knowledge of how you innovate in this scenario to be shared with other domains, whether that’s water, solar energy or humanitarian crises.”

It is estimated that 90% of people who need wheelchairs, hearing aids and other enabling technologies cannot access them.

The Impact Fund will be looking for the angle where GDI Hub can make the most difference. “Part of the problem for assistive technology globally is that there isn’t a global coordinating body,” explains Professor Holloway. “The World Health Organization leads, but we know that assistive technology goes beyond health. There are different sources funding different things and they’re not connected.

Research councils are funding great advances in myoelectric prosthetics, but is that the most innovative thing? Because there is a really big problem, which is how do we get what we already know works to everybody?” GDI Hub’s plan involves bringing together 44 partners, from engaging with the WHO and UNICEF to local NGOs and people in informal settlements in Kenya. It does this through its flagship FCDO-funded AT2030 programme.

Thought process

GDI Hub’s latest launch is a £4 million Assistive Technologies Impact Fund (via a research grant from the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO)) that will look at how to grow assistive technologies globally, specifically in low- and middle-income countries, with a focus on Africa.

“The really interesting bit for UCL is thinking about how we feed research expertise into something like that and how we can make the process of innovation better,” says Professor Holloway. “A lot of innovation process tends to stay within a fund and is not disseminated, but something like assistive technology is never going to be a quick-win fund. This does not mean it can’t be high growth.

The trick will be in the match between business model and technological advance. We need people who are investing mainly for the social good for now and are happy to shoulder risk as we make this sector work. And we want that social-good knowledge of how you innovate in this scenario to be shared with other domains, whether that’s water, solar energy or humanitarian crises.”

It is estimated that 90% of people who need wheelchairs, hearing aids and other enabling technologies cannot access them.

The Impact Fund will be looking for the angle where GDI Hub can make the most difference. “Part of the problem for assistive technology globally is that there isn’t a global coordinating body,” explains Professor Holloway. “The World Health Organization leads, but we know that assistive technology goes beyond health. There are different sources funding different things and they’re not connected.

Research councils are funding great advances in myoelectric prosthetics, but is that the most innovative thing? Because there is a really big problem, which is how do we get what we already know works to everybody?” GDI Hub’s plan involves bringing together 44 partners, from engaging with the WHO and UNICEF to local NGOs and people in informal settlements in Kenya. It does this through its flagship FCDO-funded AT2030 programme.

Thought process

GDI Hub’s latest launch is a £4 million Assistive Technologies Impact Fund (via a research grant from the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO)) that will look at how to grow assistive technologies globally, specifically in low- and middle-income countries, with a focus on Africa.

“The really interesting bit for UCL is thinking about how we feed research expertise into something like that and how we can make the process of innovation better,” says Professor Holloway. “A lot of innovation process tends to stay within a fund and is not disseminated, but something like assistive technology is never going to be a quick-win fund. This does not mean it can’t be high growth.

The trick will be in the match between business model and technological advance. We need people who are investing mainly for the social good for now and are happy to shoulder risk as we make this sector work. And we want that social-good knowledge of how you innovate in this scenario to be shared with other domains, whether that’s water, solar energy or humanitarian crises.”

It is estimated that 90% of people who need wheelchairs, hearing aids and other enabling technologies cannot access them.

The Impact Fund will be looking for the angle where GDI Hub can make the most difference. “Part of the problem for assistive technology globally is that there isn’t a global coordinating body,” explains Professor Holloway. “The World Health Organization leads, but we know that assistive technology goes beyond health. There are different sources funding different things and they’re not connected.

Research councils are funding great advances in myoelectric prosthetics, but is that the most innovative thing? Because there is a really big problem, which is how do we get what we already know works to everybody?” GDI Hub’s plan involves bringing together 44 partners, from engaging with the WHO and UNICEF to local NGOs and people in informal settlements in Kenya. It does this through its flagship FCDO-funded AT2030 programme.

Telling stories

Professor Holloway thinks that “one of the biggest problems is just getting people to care”. When people are dying of HIV or malaria, or they don’t have access to water or sanitation, it can be hard for organisations such as GDI Hub to make the case for eyeglasses and wheelchairs, or the value of hearing tests.

“Governments aren’t saying no,” says Professor Holloway, “but there is still stigma and discrimination attached to disabilities.”

She cites people who regard disabled people as useless or even cursed. “A lot of our work is about changing that attitude and we’re exploring different ways of doing that, such as partnering with Shujazz magazine, a digital and print publication that reaches more than half of Kenyan and Tanzanian youth. As well as conducting baseline studies with them about attitudes to disability and assisted technology, we’ve also introduced disabled characters into the magazine’s narratives.”

Telling stories

Professor Holloway thinks that “one of the biggest problems is just getting people to care”. When people are dying of HIV or malaria, or they don’t have access to water or sanitation, it can be hard for organisations such as GDI Hub to make the case for eyeglasses and wheelchairs, or the value of hearing tests.

“Governments aren’t saying no,” says Professor Holloway, “but there is still stigma and discrimination attached to disabilities.”

She cites people who regard disabled people as useless or even cursed. “A lot of our work is about changing that attitude and we’re exploring different ways of doing that, such as partnering with Shujazz magazine, a digital and print publication that reaches more than half of Kenyan and Tanzanian youth. As well as conducting baseline studies with them about attitudes to disability and assisted technology, we’ve also introduced disabled characters into the magazine’s narratives.”

Telling stories

Professor Holloway thinks that “one of the biggest problems is just getting people to care”. When people are dying of HIV or malaria, or they don’t have access to water or sanitation, it can be hard for organisations such as GDI Hub to make the case for eyeglasses and wheelchairs, or the value of hearing tests.

“Governments aren’t saying no,” says Professor Holloway, “but there is still stigma and discrimination attached to disabilities.”

She cites people who regard disabled people as useless or even cursed. “A lot of our work is about changing that attitude and we’re exploring different ways of doing that, such as partnering with Shujazz magazine, a digital and print publication that reaches more than half of Kenyan and Tanzanian youth. As well as conducting baseline studies with them about attitudes to disability and assisted technology, we’ve also introduced disabled characters into the magazine’s narratives.”

A page from Shujazz magazine
SHUJAZZ MAGAZINE
Working in partnership with GDI Hub, the publication has introduced disabled characters into its storylines
SHUJAZZ MAGAZINE
Working in partnership with GDI Hub, the publication has introduced disabled characters into its storylines
SHUJAZZ MAGAZINE
Working in partnership with GDI Hub, the publication has introduced disabled characters into its storylines

Meanwhile, a complementary AT2030 project led by Victoria Austin, co-founder and director of GDI Hub, and Loughborough University is looking at how the Paralympics can help overcome stigma. This builds on Victoria’s expertise as lead for the London 2012 Paralympic legacy programme. The team are also working with the Agitos Foundation to develop an educational package for primary schools with the help of the International Paralympic Committee.

Meanwhile, a complementary AT2030 project led by Victoria Austin, co-founder and director of GDI Hub, and Loughborough University is looking at how the Paralympics can help overcome stigma. This builds on Victoria’s expertise as lead for the London 2012 Paralympic legacy programme. The team are also working with the Agitos Foundation to develop an educational package for primary schools with the help of the International Paralympic Committee.

Meanwhile, a complementary AT2030 project led by Victoria Austin, co-founder and director of GDI Hub, and Loughborough University is looking at how the Paralympics can help overcome stigma. This builds on Victoria’s expertise as lead for the London 2012 Paralympic legacy programme. The team are also working with the Agitos Foundation to develop an educational package for primary schools with the help of the International Paralympic Committee.

INFLUENCERS

GDI Hub has been working with the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSMA) on a mobile disability-gap report. This looked at the prevalence of having a mobile phone, especially in the global South. “We’re trying to influence the mobile network operators into improving mobile access for disabled people,” says Professor Holloway. “Since they only listen to the GSMA, we partnered with it, helping it develop a research framework that also allows us to publish academic papers. GDI Hub provided technical expertise that is really specific, but our team are also trained in enough business analytics and thinking that they can translate that knowledge well to help the GSMA produce its report.”

INFLUENCERS

GDI Hub has been working with the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSMA) on a mobile disability-gap report. This looked at the prevalence of having a mobile phone, especially in the global South. “We’re trying to influence the mobile network operators into improving mobile access for disabled people,” says Professor Holloway. “Since they only listen to the GSMA, we partnered with it, helping it develop a research framework that also allows us to publish academic papers. GDI Hub provided technical expertise that is really specific, but our team are also trained in enough business analytics and thinking that they can translate that knowledge well to help the GSMA produce its report.”

INFLUENCERS

GDI Hub has been working with the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSMA) on a mobile disability-gap report. This looked at the prevalence of having a mobile phone, especially in the global South. “We’re trying to influence the mobile network operators into improving mobile access for disabled people,” says Professor Holloway. “Since they only listen to the GSMA, we partnered with it, helping it develop a research framework that also allows us to publish academic papers. GDI Hub provided technical expertise that is really specific, but our team are also trained in enough business analytics and thinking that they can translate that knowledge well to help the GSMA produce its report.”

In fashion

Back in London, a major innovation for GDI Hub is its new MSc in Disability, Design and Innovation, awarded by UCL but taught in conjunction with the London College of Fashion and Loughborough University, also located on the Olympic Park. “It shows how UCL is better than other leading institutions at being able to work collaboratively,” says Professor Holloway.

Inevitably, questions were asked as to the suitability of the fashion partnership. “The thing is that assistive technology is really hard to market; it doesn’t follow normal business models of a start-up,” explains Professor Holloway, “and it actually has a lot more in common with fashion than it does with other medical devices.”

In fashion

Back in London, a major innovation for GDI Hub is its new MSc in Disability, Design and Innovation, awarded by UCL but taught in conjunction with the London College of Fashion and Loughborough University, also located on the Olympic Park. “It shows how UCL is better than other leading institutions at being able to work collaboratively,” says Professor Holloway.

Inevitably, questions were asked as to the suitability of the fashion partnership. “The thing is that assistive technology is really hard to market; it doesn’t follow normal business models of a start-up,” explains Professor Holloway, “and it actually has a lot more in common with fashion than it does with other medical devices.”

In fashion

Back in London, a major innovation for GDI Hub is its new MSc in Disability, Design and Innovation, awarded by UCL but taught in conjunction with the London College of Fashion and Loughborough University, also located on the Olympic Park. “It shows how UCL is better than other leading institutions at being able to work collaboratively,” says Professor Holloway.

Inevitably, questions were asked as to the suitability of the fashion partnership. “The thing is that assistive technology is really hard to market; it doesn’t follow normal business models of a start-up,” explains Professor Holloway, “and it actually has a lot more in common with fashion than it does with other medical devices.”

A young boy with a bionic arm

What threads the MSc and the institutions together is GDI Hub’s idea of a disability interactions framework of assisted technology, accessible technologies and the resulting life change they bring, along with an inclusive curriculum that is always striving to innovate for the bottom billion of the global population.

What threads the MSc and the institutions together is GDI Hub’s idea of a disability interactions framework of assisted technology, accessible technologies and the resulting life change they bring, along with an inclusive curriculum that is always striving to innovate for the bottom billion of the global population.

What threads the MSc and the institutions together is GDI Hub’s idea of a disability interactions framework of assisted technology, accessible technologies and the resulting life change they bring, along with an inclusive curriculum that is always striving to innovate for the bottom billion of the global population.

INNOVATORS

GDI Hub has just completed work on a shape memory alloy braille reader, which allows blind people to draw as well as read. This is being led by one of GDI Hub’s rising stars, Tigmanshu Bhatnager. “We’re going to patent the material development but release the application for braille readers open source, so anybody can use it,” says Professor Holloway. “It’s another example of how we sometimes design for disability, but then you can use that to solve lots of other problems. You have to advance the state of the art because it’s a complicated problem and now you’ve got a new solution.”

INNOVATORS

GDI Hub has just completed work on a shape memory alloy braille reader, which allows blind people to draw as well as read. This is being led by one of GDI Hub’s rising stars, Tigmanshu Bhatnager. “We’re going to patent the material development but release the application for braille readers open source, so anybody can use it,” says Professor Holloway. “It’s another example of how we sometimes design for disability, but then you can use that to solve lots of other problems. You have to advance the state of the art because it’s a complicated problem and now you’ve got a new solution.”

INNOVATORS

GDI Hub has just completed work on a shape memory alloy braille reader, which allows blind people to draw as well as read. This is being led by one of GDI Hub’s rising stars, Tigmanshu Bhatnager. “We’re going to patent the material development but release the application for braille readers open source, so anybody can use it,” says Professor Holloway. “It’s another example of how we sometimes design for disability, but then you can use that to solve lots of other problems. You have to advance the state of the art because it’s a complicated problem and now you’ve got a new solution.”

Letting go

A key part of GDI Hub’s mission is to accelerate disability innovation. “If we want to accelerate something, we need things to come in, then we need to work with people and then we need to let the project go,” says Professor Holloway. “It’s human nature, not knowing when to let go, but there comes a point when you’re not best placed to control the project anymore.”

GDI Hub prides itself on being open and collaborative, with an energetic team that is eager to help.

“If you come to us with an idea and it has a social-justice angle, we would be able to help you galvanise around that, and we know how to help you do that via our academic vigour and our ability to deliver the impact on the ground. We listen to what people need, we know what we can do and what we can provide and then we move the idea forward.”

Letting go

A key part of GDI Hub’s mission is to accelerate disability innovation. “If we want to accelerate something, we need things to come in, then we need to work with people and then we need to let the project go,” says Professor Holloway. “It’s human nature, not knowing when to let go, but there comes a point when you’re not best placed to control the project anymore.”

GDI Hub prides itself on being open and collaborative, with an energetic team that is eager to help.

“If you come to us with an idea and it has a social-justice angle, we would be able to help you galvanise around that, and we know how to help you do that via our academic vigour and our ability to deliver the impact on the ground. We listen to what people need, we know what we can do and what we can provide and then we move the idea forward.”

Letting go

A key part of GDI Hub’s mission is to accelerate disability innovation. “If we want to accelerate something, we need things to come in, then we need to work with people and then we need to let the project go,” says Professor Holloway. “It’s human nature, not knowing when to let go, but there comes a point when you’re not best placed to control the project anymore.”

GDI Hub prides itself on being open and collaborative, with an energetic team that is eager to help.

“If you come to us with an idea and it has a social-justice angle, we would be able to help you galvanise around that, and we know how to help you do that via our academic vigour and our ability to deliver the impact on the ground. We listen to what people need, we know what we can do and what we can provide and then we move the idea forward.”

A prosthetic leg

What's next?

GDI Hub is in itself an innovation. “Although led academically by UCL and our partners, it’s the ethos of the Paralympics that has spun into UCL,” explains Professor Holloway. “But in order to really make change happen, we have to be at a level that has the agency to make the decisions. We need to ask ourselves if we want to evolve GDI Hub into an advocacy and testing facility that informs policymakers, or do we want to become the policymakers ourselves? And how do we do that?”

The close working relationship between GDI Hub and the WHO is helping to drive this forward.

Could you mentor?

GDI Hub is looking for alumni with an interest and care for disability, who might like to become a mentor. “We’ve found that disabled students joining the MSc would benefit from mentoring. This can be the first time that they’re trying to break out of the mould – especially for students from low- to middle-income countries. We try and partner people through our board, so if you happen to be a deaf person, you might like a mentor who is also deaf. Sometimes you just need someone who has been through it to understand how to help you deal with things.” If you can help, please send an email with ‘MENTOR’ in the subject line to: t.adlam@ucl.ac.uk

Follow Professor Catherine Holloway on Twitter @cathyholloway1

Learn more about GDI Hub

Photography Stocksy

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

What's next?

GDI Hub is in itself an innovation. “Although led academically by UCL and our partners, it’s the ethos of the Paralympics that has spun into UCL,” explains Professor Holloway. “But in order to really make change happen, we have to be at a level that has the agency to make the decisions. We need to ask ourselves if we want to evolve GDI Hub into an advocacy and testing facility that informs policymakers, or do we want to become the policymakers ourselves? And how do we do that?”

The close working relationship between GDI Hub and the WHO is helping to drive this forward.

Could you mentor?

GDI Hub is looking for alumni with an interest and care for disability, who might like to become a mentor. “We’ve found that disabled students joining the MSc would benefit from mentoring. This can be the first time that they’re trying to break out of the mould – especially for students from low- to middle-income countries. We try and partner people through our board, so if you happen to be a deaf person, you might like a mentor who is also deaf. Sometimes you just need someone who has been through it to understand how to help you deal with things.” If you can help, please send an email with ‘MENTOR’ in the subject line to: t.adlam@ucl.ac.uk

Follow Professor Catherine Holloway on Twitter @cathyholloway1

Learn more about GDI Hub

Photography Stocksy

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

What's next?

GDI Hub is in itself an innovation. “Although led academically by UCL and our partners, it’s the ethos of the Paralympics that has spun into UCL,” explains Professor Holloway. “But in order to really make change happen, we have to be at a level that has the agency to make the decisions. We need to ask ourselves if we want to evolve GDI Hub into an advocacy and testing facility that informs policymakers, or do we want to become the policymakers ourselves? And how do we do that?”

The close working relationship between GDI Hub and the WHO is helping to drive this forward.

Could you mentor?

GDI Hub is looking for alumni with an interest and care for disability, who might like to become a mentor. “We’ve found that disabled students joining the MSc would benefit from mentoring. This can be the first time that they’re trying to break out of the mould – especially for students from low- to middle-income countries. We try and partner people through our board, so if you happen to be a deaf person, you might like a mentor who is also deaf. Sometimes you just need someone who has been through it to understand how to help you deal with things.” If you can help, please send an email with ‘MENTOR’ in the subject line to: t.adlam@ucl.ac.uk

Follow Professor Catherine Holloway on Twitter @cathyholloway1

Learn more about GDI Hub

Photography Stocksy

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.