Global giving

Distance doesn’t mean disconnection for alumni volunteers and donors. James Davis, Director of Alumni Relations, celebrates UCL’s alumni giving back across the globe

Illustration of the globe with certain landmarks depicted, such as Big Ben and the Sydney Opera House

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

UCL’s home may be in London, but wherever you are in the world, you’re probably not far from a UCL graduate. The university has alumni in more than 190 countries, and while many live a great distance away from campus, thousands still have a strong connection. In fact, some of our most enthusiastic volunteers and donors live thousands of miles away from Bloomsbury.

Our global alumni groups are a great example of how graduates the world over give their time to the UCL community. Supportive as well as social, our volunteer-run groups hold events and activities so that graduates can meet nearby alumni and stay in touch with their peers. Recently, the UCL New York Alumni Club held their seventh annual Central Park picnic, which is a great example of an informal, family-friendly activity. Other events are more careers-focused; for example, the UCL Recent Graduates Network leads in India recently arranged for three renowned alumni to speak to new graduates about careers. There’s so much going on and that’s thanks to the volunteers.

The pandemic has forced groups to adapt what they do, which has led to some inventive initiatives. Early on, the UCL Mexican Alumni Association put together a series of Covid-19-focused webinars featuring high-profile figures, including then-US Ambassador to Mexico Christopher Landau. But it’s not only alumni groups giving their time to UCL; with the pandemic meaning most of us were spending lots of time indoors, digital content has been more popular than ever, so we were delighted to have Vivienne Parry OBE (UCL Zoology 1978) hosting the Coronavirus: The Whole Story podcast. The podcast – which reached more than 80,000 listeners – explored the virus and its impact from every angle, and having Vivienne, a top broadcaster, at the helm made for fantastic listening.

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

UCL’s home may be in London, but wherever you are in the world, you’re probably not far from a UCL graduate. The university has alumni in more than 190 countries, and while many live a great distance away from campus, thousands still have a strong connection. In fact, some of our most enthusiastic volunteers and donors live thousands of miles away from Bloomsbury.

Our global alumni groups are a great example of how graduates the world over give their time to the UCL community. Supportive as well as social, our volunteer-run groups hold events and activities so that graduates can meet nearby alumni and stay in touch with their peers. Recently, the UCL New York Alumni Club held their seventh annual Central Park picnic, which is a great example of an informal, family-friendly activity. Other events are more careers-focused; for example, the UCL Recent Graduates Network leads in India recently arranged for three renowned alumni to speak to new graduates about careers. There’s so much going on and that’s thanks to the volunteers.

The pandemic has forced groups to adapt what they do, which has led to some inventive initiatives. Early on, the UCL Mexican Alumni Association put together a series of Covid-19-focused webinars featuring high-profile figures, including then-US Ambassador to Mexico Christopher Landau. But it’s not only alumni groups giving their time to UCL; with the pandemic meaning most of us were spending lots of time indoors, digital content has been more popular than ever, so we were delighted to have Vivienne Parry OBE (UCL Zoology 1978) hosting the Coronavirus: The Whole Story podcast. The podcast – which reached more than 80,000 listeners – explored the virus and its impact from every angle, and having Vivienne, a top broadcaster, at the helm made for fantastic listening.

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

UCL’s home may be in London, but wherever you are in the world, you’re probably not far from a UCL graduate. The university has alumni in more than 190 countries, and while many live a great distance away from campus, thousands still have a strong connection. In fact, some of our most enthusiastic volunteers and donors live thousands of miles away from Bloomsbury.

Our global alumni groups are a great example of how graduates the world over give their time to the UCL community. Supportive as well as social, our volunteer-run groups hold events and activities so that graduates can meet nearby alumni and stay in touch with their peers. Recently, the UCL New York Alumni Club held their seventh annual Central Park picnic, which is a great example of an informal, family-friendly activity. Other events are more careers-focused; for example, the UCL Recent Graduates Network leads in India recently arranged for three renowned alumni to speak to new graduates about careers. There’s so much going on and that’s thanks to the volunteers.

The pandemic has forced groups to adapt what they do, which has led to some inventive initiatives. Early on, the UCL Mexican Alumni Association put together a series of Covid-19-focused webinars featuring high-profile figures, including then-US Ambassador to Mexico Christopher Landau. But it’s not only alumni groups giving their time to UCL; with the pandemic meaning most of us were spending lots of time indoors, digital content has been more popular than ever, so we were delighted to have Vivienne Parry OBE (UCL Zoology 1978) hosting the Coronavirus: The Whole Story podcast. The podcast – which reached more than 80,000 listeners – explored the virus and its impact from every angle, and having Vivienne, a top broadcaster, at the helm made for fantastic listening.

“It’s often empathy that inspires our alumni donors”
“It’s often empathy that inspires our alumni donors”
“It’s often empathy that inspires our alumni donors”

Being a student at UCL is often a transformative experience. Years later, most alumni still remember their time at university – the great times on campus and (for some) the challenges, such as managing finances or finding their first job. I think it’s this sense of shared experience that inspires many of our alumni volunteers and donors. When the pandemic meant many students lost their part-time jobs or were unexpectedly paying for travel or accommodation, alumni all over the world donated to the UCL Emergency Assistance Fund, which supported financially vulnerable students. It’s often this same sense of empathy that inspires our alumni donors to fund scholarships and bursaries; the scale is different, but the motivation to help the students following in their footsteps is the same.

One of the reasons UCL has such an international alumni community is because the university’s research is world leading. That draws students to study with us, and it’s also a big reason why alumni choose to stay in touch, even when they no longer live in London. For example, Max Bittner (UCL History and Economics 2001) has lived all over the world, having grown up in Germany, set up the e-commerce platform Lazada in Singapore, and most recently moved to Paris as CEO of Vestiaire Collective. He’s a true global citizen, yet he chooses to support initiatives such as the UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose because its work makes a global impact.

Below, you’ll read stories illustrating how alumni from Belgium to Brazil have given back to UCL in support of students, graduates and research. I hope you enjoy learning about the creative and meaningful activity taking place. And to all our alumni supporters, I want to say a huge thank-you; I can’t overstate how grateful UCL is to have you as our advocates.

James Davis is Director of Alumni Relations

Being a student at UCL is often a transformative experience. Years later, most alumni still remember their time at university – the great times on campus and (for some) the challenges, such as managing finances or finding their first job. I think it’s this sense of shared experience that inspires many of our alumni volunteers and donors. When the pandemic meant many students lost their part-time jobs or were unexpectedly paying for travel or accommodation, alumni all over the world donated to the UCL Emergency Assistance Fund, which supported financially vulnerable students. It’s often this same sense of empathy that inspires our alumni donors to fund scholarships and bursaries; the scale is different, but the motivation to help the students following in their footsteps is the same.

One of the reasons UCL has such an international alumni community is because the university’s research is world leading. That draws students to study with us, and it’s also a big reason why alumni choose to stay in touch, even when they no longer live in London. For example, Max Bittner (UCL History and Economics 2001) has lived all over the world, having grown up in Germany, set up the e-commerce platform Lazada in Singapore, and most recently moved to Paris as CEO of Vestiaire Collective. He’s a true global citizen, yet he chooses to support initiatives such as the UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose because its work makes a global impact.

Below, you’ll read stories illustrating how alumni from Belgium to Brazil have given back to UCL in support of students, graduates and research. I hope you enjoy learning about the creative and meaningful activity taking place. And to all our alumni supporters, I want to say a huge thank-you; I can’t overstate how grateful UCL is to have you as our advocates.

James Davis is Director of Alumni Relations

Being a student at UCL is often a transformative experience. Years later, most alumni still remember their time at university – the great times on campus and (for some) the challenges, such as managing finances or finding their first job. I think it’s this sense of shared experience that inspires many of our alumni volunteers and donors. When the pandemic meant many students lost their part-time jobs or were unexpectedly paying for travel or accommodation, alumni all over the world donated to the UCL Emergency Assistance Fund, which supported financially vulnerable students. It’s often this same sense of empathy that inspires our alumni donors to fund scholarships and bursaries; the scale is different, but the motivation to help the students following in their footsteps is the same.

One of the reasons UCL has such an international alumni community is because the university’s research is world leading. That draws students to study with us, and it’s also a big reason why alumni choose to stay in touch, even when they no longer live in London. For example, Max Bittner (UCL History and Economics 2001) has lived all over the world, having grown up in Germany, set up the e-commerce platform Lazada in Singapore, and most recently moved to Paris as CEO of Vestiaire Collective. He’s a true global citizen, yet he chooses to support initiatives such as the UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose because its work makes a global impact.

Below, you’ll read stories illustrating how alumni from Belgium to Brazil have given back to UCL in support of students, graduates and research. I hope you enjoy learning about the creative and meaningful activity taking place. And to all our alumni supporters, I want to say a huge thank-you; I can’t overstate how grateful UCL is to have you as our advocates.

James Davis is Director of Alumni Relations

Africa

1. AFRICA

Volunteers

Beryl Ojwang and Echezona Udokanma

1. AFRICA

Volunteers

Beryl Ojwang and Echezona Udokanma

1. AFRICA

Volunteers

Beryl Ojwang and Echezona Udokanma

Beryl Ojwang and Echezona Udokanma (both MSc Global Health and Development 2019) have first-hand experience of the enabling power of giving back to UCL, having joined the university through the donor-funded UCL African Graduate Scholars programme. Now alumni, both are enthusiastic ambassadors for their alma mater. An impactful way for graduates to share their experiences and insights is to take part in events. For Beryl and Echezona, the launch of UCL’s Donor Wall – an on-campus art installation acknowledging UCL’s most generous donors – provided the perfect opportunity to celebrate the power of the philanthropy that brought them to UCL. Both have since written about their student experiences, giving testimonials of their time at the university. An easy way to give back to UCL, graduate testimonials make a big difference for prospective students, helping them feel informed and empowered. “Volunteering as a student and now as an alumnus means maintaining a connection with UCL – a cutting-edge global university,” says Echezona.

 


Beryl Ojwang and Echezona Udokanma (both MSc Global Health and Development 2019) have first-hand experience of the enabling power of giving back to UCL, having joined the university through the donor-funded UCL African Graduate Scholars programme. Now alumni, both are enthusiastic ambassadors for their alma mater. An impactful way for graduates to share their experiences and insights is to take part in events. For Beryl and Echezona, the launch of UCL’s Donor Wall – an on-campus art installation acknowledging UCL’s most generous donors – provided the perfect opportunity to celebrate the power of the philanthropy that brought them to UCL. Both have since written about their student experiences, giving testimonials of their time at the university. An easy way to give back to UCL, graduate testimonials make a big difference for prospective students, helping them feel informed and empowered. “Volunteering as a student and now as an alumnus means maintaining a connection with UCL – a cutting-edge global university,” says Echezona.

 


Beryl Ojwang and Echezona Udokanma (both MSc Global Health and Development 2019) have first-hand experience of the enabling power of giving back to UCL, having joined the university through the donor-funded UCL African Graduate Scholars programme. Now alumni, both are enthusiastic ambassadors for their alma mater. An impactful way for graduates to share their experiences and insights is to take part in events. For Beryl and Echezona, the launch of UCL’s Donor Wall – an on-campus art installation acknowledging UCL’s most generous donors – provided the perfect opportunity to celebrate the power of the philanthropy that brought them to UCL. Both have since written about their student experiences, giving testimonials of their time at the university. An easy way to give back to UCL, graduate testimonials make a big difference for prospective students, helping them feel informed and empowered. “Volunteering as a student and now as an alumnus means maintaining a connection with UCL – a cutting-edge global university,” says Echezona.

 


Donor

2. ASIA

Donor

The Leung family, on behalf of Dr Nancy Leung

2. ASIA

Donor

The Leung family, on behalf of Dr Nancy Leung

2. ASIA

Donor

The Leung family, on behalf of Dr Nancy Leung

Dr Nancy Leung studied at UCL in the 1970s, completing BSc, MBBS, MSc and MD degrees with the UCL Faculty of Medical Sciences. Her time at UCL prepared her for a distinguished 30-year career at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she rose to Adjunct Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine. During her career, Dr Leung fought to eliminate Hepatitis B, developing what she learned at UCL with the aim of benefiting her community, and her passion to improve society continues.

Dr Nancy Leung studied at UCL in the 1970s, completing BSc, MBBS, MSc and MD degrees with the UCL Faculty of Medical Sciences. Her time at UCL prepared her for a distinguished 30-year career at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she rose to Adjunct Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine. During her career, Dr Leung fought to eliminate Hepatitis B, developing what she learned at UCL with the aim of benefiting her community, and her passion to improve society continues.

Dr Nancy Leung studied at UCL in the 1970s, completing BSc, MBBS, MSc and MD degrees with the UCL Faculty of Medical Sciences. Her time at UCL prepared her for a distinguished 30-year career at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she rose to Adjunct Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine. During her career, Dr Leung fought to eliminate Hepatitis B, developing what she learned at UCL with the aim of benefiting her community, and her passion to improve society continues.

When Dr Leung died in July 2020, she left a gift in her will to UCL. Her family also created an endowed fund in her memory, to continue Dr Leung’s legacy of educating and supporting medical students, and helping build a better world.

Legacy gifts have played a vital role in UCL’s development since as far back as 1871, when the UCL Slade School of Fine Art was established through the bequest of Felix Slade. By leaving a legacy gift, supporters become an integral part of the UCL community, now and in perpetuity.
Learn more about leaving a legacy to UCL

When Dr Leung died in July 2020, she left a gift in her will to UCL. Her family also created an endowed fund in her memory, to continue Dr Leung’s legacy of educating and supporting medical students, and helping build a better world.

Legacy gifts have played a vital role in UCL’s development since as far back as 1871, when the UCL Slade School of Fine Art was established through the bequest of Felix Slade. By leaving a legacy gift, supporters become an integral part of the UCL community, now and in perpetuity.
Learn more about leaving a legacy to UCL

When Dr Leung died in July 2020, she left a gift in her will to UCL. Her family also created an endowed fund in her memory, to continue Dr Leung’s legacy of educating and supporting medical students, and helping build a better world.

Legacy gifts have played a vital role in UCL’s development since as far back as 1871, when the UCL Slade School of Fine Art was established through the bequest of Felix Slade. By leaving a legacy gift, supporters become an integral part of the UCL community, now and in perpetuity.
Learn more about leaving a legacy to UCL

Asia2 (1)



London

3. UK

Donors

Tom Naughton and Amanda Clift-Matthews

3. UK

Donors

Tom Naughton and Amanda Clift-Matthews

3. UK

Donors

Tom Naughton and Amanda Clift-Matthews

Tom Naughton (UCL Mathematics with Economics 1994) and Amanda Clift-Matthews (UCL Law 1994, pictured) have been a couple since they met at UCL, and they aim to readdress social imbalances with their philanthropy. To this end, they have funded proof-of-principle projects at the UCL Institute for Global Health on tackling gender inequality and violence among residents of informal settlements in urban South Asia; research to understand multimorbidity in households affected by tuberculosis; and Neotree, an app to help health workers in poorly resourced areas to reduce infant mortality. Alongside these, they have sponsored a UCL Faculty of Laws student since 1997.

Tom Naughton (UCL Mathematics with Economics 1994) and Amanda Clift-Matthews (UCL Law 1994, pictured) have been a couple since they met at UCL, and they aim to readdress social imbalances with their philanthropy. To this end, they have funded proof-of-principle projects at the UCL Institute for Global Health on tackling gender inequality and violence among residents of informal settlements in urban South Asia; research to understand multimorbidity in households affected by tuberculosis; and Neotree, an app to help health workers in poorly resourced areas to reduce infant mortality. Alongside these, they have sponsored a UCL Faculty of Laws student since 1997.

Tom Naughton (UCL Mathematics with Economics 1994) and Amanda Clift-Matthews (UCL Law 1994, pictured) have been a couple since they met at UCL, and they aim to readdress social imbalances with their philanthropy. To this end, they have funded proof-of-principle projects at the UCL Institute for Global Health on tackling gender inequality and violence among residents of informal settlements in urban South Asia; research to understand multimorbidity in households affected by tuberculosis; and Neotree, an app to help health workers in poorly resourced areas to reduce infant mortality. Alongside these, they have sponsored a UCL Faculty of Laws student since 1997.

“We chose to fund a law student from a disadvantaged background because we both felt it to be a degree that can truly reshape the course of a person’s life,” says Amanda. “As a member of a profession that struggles to be representative of our broad, pluralised society, especially at the higher end, I am a strong believer that not only is encouraging equality of opportunity morally right, but that diversity reinforces legitimacy and champions merit.”

“We chose to fund a law student from a disadvantaged background because we both felt it to be a degree that can truly reshape the course of a person’s life,” says Amanda. “As a member of a profession that struggles to be representative of our broad, pluralised society, especially at the higher end, I am a strong believer that not only is encouraging equality of opportunity morally right, but that diversity reinforces legitimacy and champions merit.”

“We chose to fund a law student from a disadvantaged background because we both felt it to be a degree that can truly reshape the course of a person’s life,” says Amanda. “As a member of a profession that struggles to be representative of our broad, pluralised society, especially at the higher end, I am a strong believer that not only is encouraging equality of opportunity morally right, but that diversity reinforces legitimacy and champions merit.”

Photograph of Amanda Clift-Matthews presenting on stage



Europe

4. EUROPE

Volunteer

Evdoxia Nerantzi

4. EUROPE

Volunteer

Evdoxia Nerantzi

4. EUROPE

Volunteer

Evdoxia Nerantzi

There are UCL alumni groups around the world, all run by volunteers who are keen to bring their local graduate community together for virtual and social events, talks and activities.

There are UCL alumni groups around the world, all run by volunteers who are keen to bring their local graduate community together for virtual and social events, talks and activities.

There are UCL alumni groups around the world, all run by volunteers who are keen to bring their local graduate community together for virtual and social events, talks and activities.

Evdoxia Nerantzi (MA Education and Technology 2015), who recently founded the UCL Brussels alumni group, says, “I am passionate about helping others and sharing with them my experience and my learnings throughout my career path. It’s really important to help current students and recent graduates to learn from your successes and even failures. This became even more vital when the pandemic limited the opportunities for interaction. Being a UCL alumni volunteer is, to my mind, like being that person whom you wished you had met when you were an undergraduate or postgraduate at UCL.”
Find your local alumni group

Evdoxia Nerantzi (MA Education and Technology 2015), who recently founded the UCL Brussels alumni group, says, “I am passionate about helping others and sharing with them my experience and my learnings throughout my career path. It’s really important to help current students and recent graduates to learn from your successes and even failures. This became even more vital when the pandemic limited the opportunities for interaction. Being a UCL alumni volunteer is, to my mind, like being that person whom you wished you had met when you were an undergraduate or postgraduate at UCL.”
Find your local alumni group

Evdoxia Nerantzi (MA Education and Technology 2015), who recently founded the UCL Brussels alumni group, says, “I am passionate about helping others and sharing with them my experience and my learnings throughout my career path. It’s really important to help current students and recent graduates to learn from your successes and even failures. This became even more vital when the pandemic limited the opportunities for interaction. Being a UCL alumni volunteer is, to my mind, like being that person whom you wished you had met when you were an undergraduate or postgraduate at UCL.”
Find your local alumni group

Photograph of UCL volunteer Evdoxia Nerantzi, she wears a white shirt with a black blazer



Middle East

5. MIDDLE EAST

Donor

George Farha

5. MIDDLE EAST

Donor

George Farha

5. MIDDLE EAST

Donor

George Farha

The name George Farha will be familiar to patrons of Gower Street’s George Farha Café. George (UCL Chemical Engineering 1991) is a keen champion of UCL. He and his wife, Suha, sponsor MSc scholarships at the UCL Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Institute for Women’s Health. George also sponsors the New Venture Awards, which offer the most talented UCL students the opportunity to launch their own business ventures. Without this gift, the entrepreneurial spirit so many of UCL’s students display would not be able to flourish as it does today. George says, “I support UCL because of its excellence and its international impact, and I endorse its determination to be a global force for good, educating its students to be global citizens.”

Though not alumni themselves, George’s family have been inspired to support UCL too. George’s parents have provided support for scholarships, while George’s son Billy began supporting UCL at just 11 years old, when he raised £12,000 for the UCL Cancer Institute by doing a sponsored run.

The name George Farha will be familiar to patrons of Gower Street’s George Farha Café. George (UCL Chemical Engineering 1991) is a keen champion of UCL. He and his wife, Suha, sponsor MSc scholarships at the UCL Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Institute for Women’s Health. George also sponsors the New Venture Awards, which offer the most talented UCL students the opportunity to launch their own business ventures. Without this gift, the entrepreneurial spirit so many of UCL’s students display would not be able to flourish as it does today. George says, “I support UCL because of its excellence and its international impact, and I endorse its determination to be a global force for good, educating its students to be global citizens.”

Though not alumni themselves, George’s family have been inspired to support UCL too. George’s parents have provided support for scholarships, while George’s son Billy began supporting UCL at just 11 years old, when he raised £12,000 for the UCL Cancer Institute by doing a sponsored run.

The name George Farha will be familiar to patrons of Gower Street’s George Farha Café. George (UCL Chemical Engineering 1991) is a keen champion of UCL. He and his wife, Suha, sponsor MSc scholarships at the UCL Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Institute for Women’s Health. George also sponsors the New Venture Awards, which offer the most talented UCL students the opportunity to launch their own business ventures. Without this gift, the entrepreneurial spirit so many of UCL’s students display would not be able to flourish as it does today. George says, “I support UCL because of its excellence and its international impact, and I endorse its determination to be a global force for good, educating its students to be global citizens.”

Though not alumni themselves, George’s family have been inspired to support UCL too. George’s parents have provided support for scholarships, while George’s son Billy began supporting UCL at just 11 years old, when he raised £12,000 for the UCL Cancer Institute by doing a sponsored run.




Ocean

6. OCEANIA

Volunteer

Justin Fleming

6. OCEANIA

Volunteer

Justin Fleming

6. OCEANIA

Volunteer

Justin Fleming

Sometimes volunteering can be as simple as sparing the time to provide a few words of encouragement. This year, UCL put out a call to its global network of more than 300,000 alumni, to share their messages with the class of 2021. After a challenging year due to the pandemic, it was more vital than ever to support new graduates. Responses came from all over the world, from Canada to Kazakhstan. In Australia, Justin Fleming (LLM Law 1991), based in Sydney, offered: “Success lies in relationships: don’t try to build an empire. Build a relationship.” This project proved that, even if you are on the other side of the world, you can still support UCL and its students.
Explore the map

Sometimes volunteering can be as simple as sparing the time to provide a few words of encouragement. This year, UCL put out a call to its global network of more than 300,000 alumni, to share their messages with the class of 2021. After a challenging year due to the pandemic, it was more vital than ever to support new graduates. Responses came from all over the world, from Canada to Kazakhstan. In Australia, Justin Fleming (LLM Law 1991), based in Sydney, offered: “Success lies in relationships: don’t try to build an empire. Build a relationship.” This project proved that, even if you are on the other side of the world, you can still support UCL and its students.
Explore the map

Sometimes volunteering can be as simple as sparing the time to provide a few words of encouragement. This year, UCL put out a call to its global network of more than 300,000 alumni, to share their messages with the class of 2021. After a challenging year due to the pandemic, it was more vital than ever to support new graduates. Responses came from all over the world, from Canada to Kazakhstan. In Australia, Justin Fleming (LLM Law 1991), based in Sydney, offered: “Success lies in relationships: don’t try to build an empire. Build a relationship.” This project proved that, even if you are on the other side of the world, you can still support UCL and its students.
Explore the map




Us

7. NORTH AMERICA

Donors

UCL Friends & Alumni Association

7. NORTH AMERICA

Donors

UCL Friends & Alumni Association

7. NORTH AMERICA

Donors

UCL Friends & Alumni Association

The UCL Friends & Alumni Association (UCLFAA) is a US non-profit organisation dedicated to raising awareness and support for research, education and innovation at UCL and building a US-based community of UCL supporters. It also connects talented US students with the opportunities UCL offers. Many deserving students have made their way from the US to Bloomsbury with support from a UCLFAA-sponsored scholarship, to study in an area where they develop the skills they need to make a difference in the world. Previous scholarships have supported students on programmes including the MSc in Dementia and the Global Public Policy and Management EMPA.

The UCL Friends & Alumni Association (UCLFAA) is a US non-profit organisation dedicated to raising awareness and support for research, education and innovation at UCL and building a US-based community of UCL supporters. It also connects talented US students with the opportunities UCL offers. Many deserving students have made their way from the US to Bloomsbury with support from a UCLFAA-sponsored scholarship, to study in an area where they develop the skills they need to make a difference in the world. Previous scholarships have supported students on programmes including the MSc in Dementia and the Global Public Policy and Management EMPA.

The UCL Friends & Alumni Association (UCLFAA) is a US non-profit organisation dedicated to raising awareness and support for research, education and innovation at UCL and building a US-based community of UCL supporters. It also connects talented US students with the opportunities UCL offers. Many deserving students have made their way from the US to Bloomsbury with support from a UCLFAA-sponsored scholarship, to study in an area where they develop the skills they need to make a difference in the world. Previous scholarships have supported students on programmes including the MSc in Dementia and the Global Public Policy and Management EMPA.

In 2020, Alexandra Maria Proca (pictured) received a scholarship from the UCLFAA to study an MSc in Machine Learning. She says, “This scholarship means a lot to me. Having many years ahead of me in higher education, the chance to be funded alleviates many of the financial pressures placed by tuition and living costs, and gives me the space and time to dedicate myself entirely to my coursework and research, without worrying about earning an income.”

In 2020, Alexandra Maria Proca (pictured) received a scholarship from the UCLFAA to study an MSc in Machine Learning. She says, “This scholarship means a lot to me. Having many years ahead of me in higher education, the chance to be funded alleviates many of the financial pressures placed by tuition and living costs, and gives me the space and time to dedicate myself entirely to my coursework and research, without worrying about earning an income.”

In 2020, Alexandra Maria Proca (pictured) received a scholarship from the UCLFAA to study an MSc in Machine Learning. She says, “This scholarship means a lot to me. Having many years ahead of me in higher education, the chance to be funded alleviates many of the financial pressures placed by tuition and living costs, and gives me the space and time to dedicate myself entirely to my coursework and research, without worrying about earning an income.”

Photograph of Alexandra Maria Proca. She wears a blue shirt with a white neck line

The organisation’s work is truly transatlantic; through its Bogue Fellowships, UCL doctoral or post-doctoral students within Physiology and Cognate Sciences are able to further their studies in the US.
Learn more about UCLFAA

The organisation’s work is truly transatlantic; through its Bogue Fellowships, UCL doctoral or post-doctoral students within Physiology and Cognate Sciences are able to further their studies in the US.
Learn more about UCLFAA

The organisation’s work is truly transatlantic; through its Bogue Fellowships, UCL doctoral or post-doctoral students within Physiology and Cognate Sciences are able to further their studies in the US.
Learn more about UCLFAA




South America

8. SOUTH AMERICA

Volunteers

Natasha Winnard

8. SOUTH AMERICA

Volunteers

Natasha Winnard

8. SOUTH AMERICA

Volunteers

Natasha Winnard

Natasha Winnard (UCL Geography 1994) has taught in schools in the UK, Africa and Asia, and is currently based in South America. From there, she volunteers her time remotely as a Graduate Guide on UCL Bentham Connect – the networking platform for the UCL community – providing support, advice and mentoring to students and alumni around the world.

Natasha Winnard (UCL Geography 1994) has taught in schools in the UK, Africa and Asia, and is currently based in South America. From there, she volunteers her time remotely as a Graduate Guide on UCL Bentham Connect – the networking platform for the UCL community – providing support, advice and mentoring to students and alumni around the world.

Natasha Winnard (UCL Geography 1994) has taught in schools in the UK, Africa and Asia, and is currently based in South America. From there, she volunteers her time remotely as a Graduate Guide on UCL Bentham Connect – the networking platform for the UCL community – providing support, advice and mentoring to students and alumni around the world.

Graduate Guides provide a short profile to be featured on UCL Bentham Connect, from where they can be contacted for assistance and insights. By engaging with the platform, volunteer Guides also help to create a relevant and supportive online space for alumni to socialise and communicate. “Some things that I did not expect to gain from volunteering are the connections and new learning that are supporting my professional life,” says Natasha. “UCL is a caring community; I very much felt that in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and I’m delighted to see that it’s still very much a priority today.”
Sign up to UCL Bentham Connect

Graduate Guides provide a short profile to be featured on UCL Bentham Connect, from where they can be contacted for assistance and insights. By engaging with the platform, volunteer Guides also help to create a relevant and supportive online space for alumni to socialise and communicate. “Some things that I did not expect to gain from volunteering are the connections and new learning that are supporting my professional life,” says Natasha. “UCL is a caring community; I very much felt that in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and I’m delighted to see that it’s still very much a priority today.”
Sign up to UCL Bentham Connect

Graduate Guides provide a short profile to be featured on UCL Bentham Connect, from where they can be contacted for assistance and insights. By engaging with the platform, volunteer Guides also help to create a relevant and supportive online space for alumni to socialise and communicate. “Some things that I did not expect to gain from volunteering are the connections and new learning that are supporting my professional life,” says Natasha. “UCL is a caring community; I very much felt that in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and I’m delighted to see that it’s still very much a priority today.”
Sign up to UCL Bentham Connect

Photograph of Natasha Winnard  a UCL volunteer. She wears glasses and a green top

Illustrations Muti, Folio art

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

 

Illustrations Muti, Folio art

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

 

Illustrations Muti, Folio art

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.