Buildings linked to eugenics movement are de-named

A picture of Galton Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building in London

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

Following consultation, UCL has de-named the Galton Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building (pictured) and Pearson Lecture Theatre.

The move is one step in a range of actions that acknowledge and address the university’s historical links with the eugenics movement. It follows a series of recommendations made by an inquiry.

A Response Group of representatives – including academic staff, equality experts and the Students’ Union – will look at actions such as:

  • funding new scholarships to study race and racism
  • a commitment to ensure UCL staff and students learn about the history and legacy of eugenics
  • the creation of a research post to further examine the university’s history of eugenics.

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

Following consultation, UCL has de-named the Galton Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building (pictured) and Pearson Lecture Theatre.

The move is one step in a range of actions that acknowledge and address the university’s historical links with the eugenics movement. It follows a series of recommendations made by an inquiry.

A Response Group of representatives – including academic staff, equality experts and the Students’ Union – will look at actions such as:

  • funding new scholarships to study race and racism
  • a commitment to ensure UCL staff and students learn about the history and legacy of eugenics
  • the creation of a research post to further examine the university’s history of eugenics.

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

Following consultation, UCL has de-named the Galton Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building (pictured) and Pearson Lecture Theatre.

The move is one step in a range of actions that acknowledge and address the university’s historical links with the eugenics movement. It follows a series of recommendations made by an inquiry.

A Response Group of representatives – including academic staff, equality experts and the Students’ Union – will look at actions such as:

  • funding new scholarships to study race and racism
  • a commitment to ensure UCL staff and students learn about the history and legacy of eugenics
  • the creation of a research post to further examine the university’s history of eugenics.
Photo of Professor Ijeoma Uchegbu

Professor Ijeoma Uchegbu, Provost’s Envoy for Race Equality and Professor of Pharmaceutical Nanoscience, says:

“Our buildings and spaces are places of learning and aspiration, and should never have been named after eugenicists. I would like to acknowledge all my colleagues and students who worked so hard to achieve this result. These individuals held one thing in common – the belief that all peoples are of equal value.”

Professor Ijeoma Uchegbu, Provost’s Envoy for Race Equality and Professor of Pharmaceutical Nanoscience, says:

“Our buildings and spaces are places of learning and aspiration, and should never have been named after eugenicists. I would like to acknowledge all my colleagues and students who worked so hard to achieve this result. These individuals held one thing in common – the belief that all peoples are of equal value.”

Professor Ijeoma Uchegbu, Provost’s Envoy for Race Equality and Professor of Pharmaceutical Nanoscience, says:

“Our buildings and spaces are places of learning and aspiration, and should never have been named after eugenicists. I would like to acknowledge all my colleagues and students who worked so hard to achieve this result. These individuals held one thing in common – the belief that all peoples are of equal value.”

Photo of Sandy Ogundele

Sandy Ogundele, Black and Minority Ethnic Students’ Officer at Students’ Union UCL, says:

“This is just the first step of a long-term process for UCL to make amends for its deeply troubling ties to eugenics and institutional racism. Now let’s sustain and channel this energy into our education, into our research, into our hiring practices and into all of our decision-making at UCL.”

Sandy Ogundele, Black and Minority Ethnic Students’ Officer at Students’ Union UCL, says:

“This is just the first step of a long-term process for UCL to make amends for its deeply troubling ties to eugenics and institutional racism. Now let’s sustain and channel this energy into our education, into our research, into our hiring practices and into all of our decision-making at UCL.”

Sandy Ogundele, Black and Minority Ethnic Students’ Officer at Students’ Union UCL, says:

“This is just the first step of a long-term process for UCL to make amends for its deeply troubling ties to eugenics and institutional racism. Now let’s sustain and channel this energy into our education, into our research, into our hiring practices and into all of our decision-making at UCL.”

To learn more about UCL's response to its history of eugenics, listen to the Living With Eugenics podcast

Get the full story

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

To learn more about UCL's response to its history of eugenics, listen to the Living With Eugenics podcast

Get the full story

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.

To learn more about UCL's response to its history of eugenics, listen to the Living With Eugenics podcast

Get the full story

This article first appeared in issue 7 of Portico magazine, published October 2020.