UCL Coronavirus Response Fund supports new research

Illustration of a virus attacking a cell

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

When the pandemic began, UCL researchers responded quickly. Supporters showed confidence in their efforts, donating more than £500,000 to the UCL Coronavirus Response Fund and opening the door to donor conversations that have led to more than £3.8 million to support targeted Covid-19 research activity. UCL’s academic community has worked tirelessly to address the pandemic from all angles and its research outputs are freely available via an open-access portal. Here are just a few examples that received crucial seed funding:

Schools:

Dr Sandra Leaton Gray (UCL Institute of Education) and her team have investigated how the pandemic has affected the 2020-graduating cohort of Year 6 children. Using their results so far, Dr Leaton Gray and her team have provided invaluable guidance for both teachers and students on successfully transitioning to secondary school during the pandemic, as well as publishing a highly praised report.

Buses:

Professor Nick Tyler (UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering) and his team are exploring how bus passengers can travel safely. As part of this, they looked at how to ventilate buses while maintaining passengers’ thermal comfort. Their findings – such as that people’s thermal comfort changes according to age and that there is very little exchange of air between a vehicle’s upper and lower decks – have already informed the design of the newest London bus.

Sexual health:

Professor Nigel Field (UCL Institute for Global Health) and his team are working to understand the impact of the pandemic on sexual and reproductive health in Britain. More than 6,500 participants were recruited for the first wave of ​the Natsal-COVID study, and preliminary findings highlighted important changes in sexual partnerships and practices, impacts on sexual and reproductive health services, and the extent to which intimacy needs have affected individuals’ Covid-19 risk.

Illustration Stocksy

 

 

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

When the pandemic began, UCL researchers responded quickly. Supporters showed confidence in their efforts, donating more than £500,000 to the UCL Coronavirus Response Fund and opening the door to donor conversations that have led to more than £3.8 million to support targeted Covid-19 research activity. UCL’s academic community has worked tirelessly to address the pandemic from all angles and its research outputs are freely available via an open-access portal. Here are just a few examples that received crucial seed funding:

Schools:

Dr Sandra Leaton Gray (UCL Institute of Education) and her team have investigated how the pandemic has affected the 2020-graduating cohort of Year 6 children. Using their results so far, Dr Leaton Gray and her team have provided invaluable guidance for both teachers and students on successfully transitioning to secondary school during the pandemic, as well as publishing a highly praised report.

Buses:

Professor Nick Tyler (UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering) and his team are exploring how bus passengers can travel safely. As part of this, they looked at how to ventilate buses while maintaining passengers’ thermal comfort. Their findings – such as that people’s thermal comfort changes according to age and that there is very little exchange of air between a vehicle’s upper and lower decks – have already informed the design of the newest London bus.

Sexual health:

Professor Nigel Field (UCL Institute for Global Health) and his team are working to understand the impact of the pandemic on sexual and reproductive health in Britain. More than 6,500 participants were recruited for the first wave of ​the Natsal-COVID study, and preliminary findings highlighted important changes in sexual partnerships and practices, impacts on sexual and reproductive health services, and the extent to which intimacy needs have affected individuals’ Covid-19 risk.

Illustration Stocksy

 

 

This article first appeared in issue 8 of Portico magazine, published November 2021.

When the pandemic began, UCL researchers responded quickly. Supporters showed confidence in their efforts, donating more than £500,000 to the UCL Coronavirus Response Fund and opening the door to donor conversations that have led to more than £3.8 million to support targeted Covid-19 research activity. UCL’s academic community has worked tirelessly to address the pandemic from all angles and its research outputs are freely available via an open-access portal. Here are just a few examples that received crucial seed funding:

Schools:

Dr Sandra Leaton Gray (UCL Institute of Education) and her team have investigated how the pandemic has affected the 2020-graduating cohort of Year 6 children. Using their results so far, Dr Leaton Gray and her team have provided invaluable guidance for both teachers and students on successfully transitioning to secondary school during the pandemic, as well as publishing a highly praised report.

Buses:

Professor Nick Tyler (UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering) and his team are exploring how bus passengers can travel safely. As part of this, they looked at how to ventilate buses while maintaining passengers’ thermal comfort. Their findings – such as that people’s thermal comfort changes according to age and that there is very little exchange of air between a vehicle’s upper and lower decks – have already informed the design of the newest London bus.

Sexual health:

Professor Nigel Field (UCL Institute for Global Health) and his team are working to understand the impact of the pandemic on sexual and reproductive health in Britain. More than 6,500 participants were recruited for the first wave of ​the Natsal-COVID study, and preliminary findings highlighted important changes in sexual partnerships and practices, impacts on sexual and reproductive health services, and the extent to which intimacy needs have affected individuals’ Covid-19 risk.

Illustration Stocksy